Chickens,Gardening,News

The Gardeners year gets under way.01 Mar

The Gardeners year gets under way.

The specific definition of the exact timing of “spring” varies according to local climate, cultures and customs. At the spring equinox, days are close to 12 hours long with day length increasing as the season progresses. Spring and “springtime” refer to the season, and also to ideas of rebirth, rejuvenation, renewal, resurrection, and regrowth.

In spring, the axis of the Earth is increasing its tilt toward the Sun and the length of daylight rapidly increases for the relevant hemisphere. The hemisphere begins to warm significantly causing new plant growth to “spring forth,” giving the season its name.

Suddenly there is everything to do. Buds on the plants are starting to fill, shoots beginning to appear. By now, especially after the few dry days we have had all the dead vegetation from last year’s plants should have been removed. Best to do this asap if not yet done so that when the new shoots come through they do not get damaged.

Camellia

Planting new plants at this time of year gives them time to settle in before the hot summer?

Roses need pruning now if you are going to give them a hard prune, I love pruning roses, I have still got to do the roses in the Courtyard. I find the harder I prune them back the better the flowers.

Lawns will need  a weed and feed, we have got a great £10 box that will do 165m sq.

Chicken poo great natural fertiliser 10kg bucket for £9.99

As we are now in March we will be filling up very quickly with wonderful ranges of plants. I have been busy over the last few weeks sourcing great quality plants at amazing prices, over 90% are grown here in the UK.

Chicken lovers we had 300 new hybrid laying pullets in yesterday, in all colours of the rainbow.

All our offers are on the website.

‘Easter goodies’ non-fattening

“‘Easter goodies’ non-fattening”

Look forward to seeing you, good advice on hand should you need it.

We have got egg loads of lovely Easter gifts.

Have a relaxing weekend!

Ashley

www.bellplantation.co.uk | www.poultrycentre.co.uk

Chickens,Gardening,News

Late Night Shopping details. National Poultry Show at Stoneleigh – this weekend16 Nov

We took delivery of our bare root hedging today, no Ash trees I am afraid!! Christmas trees will be with us in about 12 days’ time. All our Christmas trees are English grown, the majority of them are from the Fasque Estate in Kincardineshire, Scotland. They have supplied us for the last 5 or 6 years, fantastic shape trees and they keep their needles, I don’t think we have had more than 6 returned in that time period. We have got a lot more of the taller trees in this year (over 2.5 meters) as they are usually the first to sell out. The team are getting very excited about the oncoming festive season, they don’t like the quieter months of October and November. The highlight is watching some families choose their tree, it can take a very long time sometimes hours!! January and February are tolerable as March (lots of customers) is around the corner. I have spent a lot of my time during November buying our Gardening products for next year. I have got a lot of new products coming in over the next 3 months to help you enjoy your “Love of the great  outdoors” and gardening experience. I have also been trying to secure funding to expand the Garden Centre, not easy in the current economic climate. We have had a great year this year and have thoroughly enjoyed having you all as our customers. I hope you have enjoyed coming up here to Bell Plantation, we have got loads planned for Gardening 2013.

Smiling Christmas Tree Team

“Smiling Christmas Tree Team”

The sausages served in the Café are again our own produce!  Delicious!

This weekend 17th & 18th we have a stand at the National Poultry Show at Stoneleigh, it would be great to see you there – Chris and Jo will be manning the stand.

We have got loads of offers on over the Christmas period, late night shopping until 9pm on 6th, 13th & 20th December. Mulled wine and mince pies.

Most Marvellous vintage Sunday 25th November.

Bell at Christmas

Keep an eye on the website for details www.bellplantation.co.uk

Have a wonderful weekend

Ashley

Chickens,Gardening,News

Fruit Trees and Spring Flowering Bulbs.03 Aug

Many thanks to all of you who came last Sunday to our Most Marvellous day. We had a fantastic day, I have never seen so many people in our Courtyard. We will be having an event on the last Sunday of the month.

Our Spring flowering bulbs started coming in this week. Despite the high rainfall they have been successfully harvested, dried and packaged in Lincolnshire.

Lavender Frizzle

“Lavender Frizzle”

I had a day out this week (surprise, surprise) to our fruit tree supplier in Tenbury Wells. A fantastic 400 acre farm covered in fruit trees and glass. About 1.2 million trees to choose from, espalier, fan, cordon, etc. We will be getting some in the next few weeks. If you have any special requirements drop me a line and I will see if I can get it for you.

Make sure you get your Box hedges trimmed well before the Autumn/Winter. They could probably do with a good feed to prevent yellowing. General maintenance, dead head roses, spray for black spot and mildew.

I have seen cabbage white butterflies about, cover up your brassica’s to prevent them laying their eggs on your plants. Agralan make a great net that should last for years.

Teak Root Furniture

“Teak Root Furniture”

As usual we have got loads of great stuff, great offers on furniture (worth buying for next year)! Keep an eye on the website.

Enjoy your Garden, have a great weekend

Ashley

www.bellplantation.co.uk | www.poultrycentre.co.uk

Chickens,Gardening,News

Bell Bumble Bees!15 Jun

Great excitement here this week, despite the appalling weather our Bumble Bees arrived!! We ordered them a couple of weeks ago.

Bell Bumbles 1

“Bell Bumbles”

Bombus terrestris Audax a really friendly, hardworking pollinator. They work in cool, windy, damp conditions. Bless them! We ordered ours complete with a wooden box to give them a bit more protection, they would have been ok in the cardboard box they came in. Bumble bee population is in decline due to habitat reduction and pesticide use. Buying a small colony and releasing it in your garden is a great way to re dress the balance. Once you have opened the box you don’t have to do anything else. It is great having them around and watching them work. Details will be on our website or give me a call if you are interested in having some.

Bell Bumbles 2

“Bell Bumbles”

Gardening tips !!

Tough doing anything when it’s like this. Great weather for weeds because you can’t get to chop them. Wind apparently is going to be a big problem this weekend. Batten down the hatches tie up or cane your tender herbaceous borders, check your tree ties.

We have named the pigs, chosen a winner for our crown drawing and paint the cockerel competition. Look out for the cockerel near the A43.

Great new furniture in Oxley’s (lifetime guarantee) and Sika. Design. 350 Chickens came in this week Cluck Cluck.

Have a great weekend

Ashley

Chickens,Gardening,News

100 New Chickens and Summer Café Menu24 May

I am pleased to say we have had another delivery of 100 chickens today. We took advantage of very low stock levels to have a real deep clean. It has been very quiet for the last 5 days not a chicken on the site, the first time in probably 15 years. Chickens are great lawn scarifiers, they scratch moss and bugs out of the soil and fertilise at the same time. If you leave them in the same place for too long they will over scarify and dig holes in the lawn. Move the pen every few days to avoid damage.

Columbian Blacktail Hen Web

"Columbian Blacktail Hen"

Chelsea was amazing, so many amazing plants, the Foxglove display was one that particularly caught my eye. One of the growers was telling me that they were dealing with low temperatures of about 4 degrees centigrade on Monday night, while I was talking to him it was 27 degrees centigrade in the tent.

Primrose Carousel

We will hopefully be stocking some amazing metal and wicker furniture that we saw at the show. I have a meeting next week to finalise the agreement. I’ll keep you posted. At least now there is a chance of sitting in the Garden.

As usual we have got loads of lovely stuff and Sheena has done a new Summer Café menu.

 

Enjoy the fresh air.

Look forward to seeing you

Ashley

P.S. keep an eye on the website for great deals.

www.bellplantation.co.uk | www.poultrycentre.co.uk

Chickens,Gardening,News

Fantastic New Plants and Easter Gifts05 Apr

Hi

What a change from last week! Suddenly we are in to protecting the growth made by tender plants. Cover up, wrap up tender plants with fleece, bubble wrap or up turned pots, another alternative is to bring plants under cover if possible. We have probably had 15 deliveries of fantastic new plants for the Easter weekend mainly from British Growers, with minus 5 degrees forecast for tonight it’s a job to know where to put them all.

There is still plenty of time to sow seeds, potatoes, corms and tubers for cropping and cutting this year.

With the hose pipe ban nearly in place water butts have been flying out the door, we have still got 20 – 30 butts in store. Micro irrigation systems and leaky pipes are sometimes allowed within the ban as you know we stock Gardena.

Vegetarian Pig

"Vegetarian Pig"

The majority of our Chickens are reared in Totnes in Devon. Due to the fuel problem there has been no white diesel in the West Country so we have struggled to get our Fowl. We had 100 pullets delivered this week and have another 200 due in next week.

The shop looks great very Easter orientated, chickens bunnies and guess what no chocolate only hot stuff in the Café.

Easter Gifts

"Easter Gifts"

We have got some great new businesses moving to the site, hopefully opening before the end of April.

I’ll keep you posted

 

Have a lovely Easter, relax and enjoy the Great Outdoors

Regards

Ashley

www.bellplantation.co.uk | www.poultrycentre.co.uk

Chickens,Gardening,News

Spring Customer Evening This Thursday!26 Mar

Thursday 29th March 6pm – 9pm

Celebrate the arrival of spring with us and get 10% off everything* for one evening only.

All your favourites for less including: herborium plants, gifts section, poultry centre and much more!

Join us at the Plantation for an evening of relaxation and bargain hunting!

http://www.bellplantation.co.uk/spring-customer-evening/

*(excludes all current offers and discounts)

www.bellplantation.co.uk | www.poultrycentre.co.uk

Chickens,Gardening,News

Plenty of Primula Colour09 Mar

Plenty of Primula Colour

"Plenty of Primula Colour"

I got into trouble last week for posting pictures of Sheena so I’ll have to give that a break for a week or two, then I’ll catch her out again.

All you dog walkers will be pleased to know that the sheep have gone from the field so feel free to let your dog’s off the lead. I suppose the muck is still a bit ripe if your dog has the urge to roll in it, best wait until it has rained.

If you have rhubarb pop a bucket over the top or buy a terracotta rhubarb forcer! This will encourage some lovely early crop able sweet growth, you only need a couple of weeks growth for a good crop from an old root.

Get some fertiliser on the garden phosphates and potash take longer to get through the soil to the roots than nitrogen, so best to get it on earlier so that the rain (if we have any) washes it through the soil to where it is needed.

We have installed 4 extra pens for our chickens, we now have 350 pullets in stock which arrived this week.

We are also getting some new piglets, which arrive before this weekend.

Jo our resident plant expert with fresh new herbs

"Jo our resident plant expert with fresh new herbs"

Have a good Gardening week

Best wishes

Ashley

www.bellplantation.co.uk | www.poultrycentre.co.uk

Chickens,Gardening,News

Spring is just around the corner. Vibrant Primulets & Poultry housing tips.17 Feb

Hi

Spring is just around the corner, yesterday I picked up the first scent of the new season, how exciting! Potatoes earlies, Jersey Royals could be planted in the next week to 10 days. Get them chitting in a cool frost free shed/garage.

The cold weather has supressed the amount of people we have seen over the last week, so we have been able to get on with treating our poultry houses. A good pasting of creosote helps preserve the wood and kills the mites.

Mashing the mites

"Mashing the mites"

We have stocked up on watering cans and water buts following the news that there may be a drought this summer, all the more reason to mulch the shrub beds to keep in the moisture, increase the organic matter and fertility.

You can colour up your Garden with vibrant Primulets, these ones have been through all the cold weather and still look great.

Colour up your garden

"Colour up your garden"

Look forward to seeing you soon

 

Regards

Ashley

www.bellplantation.co.uk | www.poultrycentre.co.uk

Chickens,Gardening,News

Happy New Year. New Garden shop in our Greenhouse. Seed Potatoes and Black Araucana in stock now.13 Jan

Hi Happy New Year to you all. Apologies for not keeping in touch Flu, Burglaries and Christmas have kept us all busy.

We have got loads happening as usual here at the Garden Centre. Our Seed Potatoes arrived yesterday are now all out on sale.

We had a new delivery of Chickens this week 250 point of lay pullets.

We have got a new variety Black Araucana that lays in excess of 220 blue / green eggs. Not quite as many as the normal hybrid but a great colour.

Brown Araucana

 

We have created a new Garden Shop in our Greenhouse all our Garden sundries will now be under one roof, this will enable us to keep a larger range of tools, fertilisers and seeds.

I hope we see you soon, we have a great team of people here to help you with your Garden or Poultry at any time.

 

Best wishes

 

Ashley

Bell Plantation Garden Centre

www.bellplantation.co.uk | www.poultrycentre.co.uk

Keep your garden flowering

Keep your garden flowering

Agapanthus

It’s been a long growing season this year. Several customers have been asking which flowering plants we have in stock, they have few flowers in their own gardens ( as they have all flowered) for displaying at their local Horticultural shows. The best way to try to prolong flowering in plants is to keep dead heading them and feed and water them. Plant some later flowering varieties Echinacea, Rudbekia, Asters, Lavender, Schizostylis, Agapanthus we have got loads of these at the Garden Centre to add masses of colour to your garden.

I hope by now most people have all their winter veg planted, there is still time to plant potatoes to crop before Christmas, be quick we have a few bags left. They are best planted in a container so that you can get them out of the severe frost.

At this time of year preserving and pickling fruit and veg should be the name of the game, freezing is very trendy and easy. Picking veg young and sweet is better than letting them get bigger and older. Sugar levels are higher and fibre levels lower in younger veg. Preserving is all about the prevention of rot, keeping the fungus and bacteria at bay, pickling, freezing, drying.

It’s a good time of year to collect seeds from plants that you would like to grow next year. I have got my eye on a Quercus castaneifolia, I can assure you there are not many of these in this country! I keep meaning to pick a few of Charlotte’s sweet peas to grow in our hedge.

The wildflowers I planted last year have looked absolutely fantastic all year, however they are now running out of steam and looking a bit untidy. A few are still flowering, it is tempting to cut them down but they must be left to set and drop their seed. Most are annuals, if we removed the vegetation now we would remove the seed as well. The vegetation is best left until completely dry and dead, remove late October. There are a few grass weeds creeping in, I am tempted to spray them with glyphosate during the winter before the wild flowers start to grow again.

Our spring flowering bulbs are now in the shop, it is good to get the daffodils in early as they root before the tulips and other bulbs. Planting bulbs now is a guarantee of masses of colour early next spring in your containers or garden.

Steve joined us this week as our Plant area manager, his previous life was 18 years with the biggest garden centre group in the country. I hope he is ok with the culture shock? We look forward to Steve helping you to enjoy your gardens and us to expand our ranges of plants at Bell Plantation.

In the Poultry department we are recruiting, we need some part time help in the poultry department, if you are interested or know someone who is drop me a line Ashley@bellplantation.co.uk

Have a great weekend

Ashley Warren

Rotten tomatoes and re-doing your lawn

Rotten tomatoes and re-doing your lawn

In August the gardener can go on holiday with no worries, provided he has mown the lawn, watered thoroughly and asked a friend to pick the fruit and vegetables’. Just depends how long the holiday is and how hot the weather. Don’t be lulled into a false sense of security with the rain showers we are getting, they hardly lay the dust. Keep pouring on the water until there is a prolonged spell of consistent rain.

rotten tomatoes

I have had a few people ask me this year about their tomatoes going rotten on the end. This is Blossom end rot it is a physiological condition, not a disease or pest. It is caused by lack of calcium. There is no quick fix, and it is difficult to save the fruits that are affected. The lack of calcium in the plant is usually caused by lack of water, calcium is taken up into the plant in the water, so if there is a lack of water the plant does not get the required amount of calcium from the soil/compost. It is less likely that your soil or compost lacks calcium, if it does add plenty of well-balanced Tomorite to the water, “Probably the best plant food in the world”, it’s as good for plants as Carlsberg.

If you have the most awful lawn in the world now is the time to start the process of re doing it. The main reason for doing it now is that you can get a perfectly flat smooth surface, the soil is so dry and easy to work, no mess, no mud! I suggest spraying the whole lawn with roundup, glyphosate, be careful not to touch any other plants as it will kill them. Leave the lawn for a couple of weeks to go brown. Once brown, cultivate by rotavating or hand digging until you achieve a very fine tilth. Once you have a fine tilth, level and stone pick and firm the soil before sowing the seed. There are numerous types of grass seed to choose from, very fine grasses good to look at not very hard wearing, harder wearing mixes which will include some ryegrass which will need mowing a little more frequently. After sowing lightly rake and firm. The other option is to lay turf instead, instant but will possibly need constant watering (if done in the summer). It sounds really easy, well it is if you have the right equipment and /or don’t mind a bit of hard work. Well worth it in the long run.
If you need more advice of help drop me a line at the Garden Centre ashley@bellplantation.co.uk

As usual we have an abundance of wonderful late flowering herbaceous plants. Great cream teas!

Have a great weekend

Ashley

Jobs in your garden – August

Jobs in your garden – August

summer flower

Water the Plants

It’s very dry at the moment so it’s really important that your plants have enough water for them to survive. The summer sun is pulling all the moisture out of the leaves and it can cause a lot of stress on your plants. Check your plants regularly to see if they are wilting and give them lots of water to keep them going.

Feed, Feed, Feed

All the watering you are doing to keep your plants alive will slowly wash the nutrients from the compost in your pots and planters so keep feeding your plants. Feed them every fortnight for the rest of the summer to keep them looking good.

Dead-head regularly

A few minutes every day of deadheading will keep the garden looking smart. It encourages plants to produce more flowers and not to run to seed. Harvesting also encourages plants to keep producing, so pick dahlias with regularity and beans and courgettes while they are still young and fresh.

Watch out for Cabbage white butterfly

Now is the time that Cabbage White Butterfly start to breed and devour your delicious cabbages. Keep an eye out for the butterfly eggs on the leaves of your brassica as they will soon turn into lots of caterpillars. When they grow you can pick them off the leaves but this will take some time, a good bug killer will also work. The best form of defence is prevention – cover your cabbages with a fine netting to stop the butterfly getting to them.

Prune Wisteria

Your Wisteria need pruning twice a year, in Jan/Feb and again in the summer. Pruning keeps its size under control and improves the quality of its flowering. Cut back to 6 leaves from the previous growth and this will encourage it to flower.

Try and have a chilled weekend and keep your trees watered

Try and have a chilled weekend and keep your trees watered

Great weather for relaxing in the shade of a large tree, drinking a cool iced drink with condensation running down the outside of the glass… Heaven!!

Just think of the poor old tree working overtime, transpiration in overdrive trying to keep its leaves from baking crisp in the searing heat.

If you have trees or shrubs planted in the last 2 -3 years give them some consideration in this fierce heat as well as your newly planted plants. The root system on 2 -3 year planted plants will very soon start to struggle finding enough water to keep them alive. I planted a row of London Plane trees last year and they are showing signs of stress, a few leaves going yellow and falling to the ground. Over the last couple of nights I have given them each 20 litres of water, if the heat stays at this level I will probably do that twice a week. When the temperature drops to 20 degrees C once a week will do until mid-September or a damn good rain.

The combines are out in force harvesting the rape and winter barley, I think it will be at least a couple of weeks before any wheat is ready in South Northants. I expect the harvest will be good this year as we have really great average weather. Could do with some rain as my cows are getting short of grass.

The fish in our pond here at the Bell Plantation have done a lot of floating on the top of the water looking dead, I am pleased to say we haven’t had any fatalities yet! Shower them with a hose pipe and they dive to the bottom of the pond. The reason is oxygen depletion in the water due to the weather. In thundery, cloudy weather the oxygenating plants produce less oxygen due to reduce sunlight, the temperatures are usually higher which warm up the water, warmer water holds less oxygen. Prevention is to have a deeper pond to help keep the water cooler and to oxygenate the water more, buy a bigger better pump or even clean the filter on your existing pump.

Pigs

We started our collection of rare breed farm animals this week with the arrival of 3 Oxford Sandy and Black females, 12 weeks old. The Oxford Sandy and Black is a breed of domestic pig originating in Oxfordshire. Named for its colour, which is a base of sandy brown with black patches, the breed is also sometimes called the “Plum Pudding” or “Oxford Forest” pig it is one of the oldest pigs native to Britain. It’s a docile pig suited to being reared outdoors, where its colour protects it from sunburn (which pink pigs tend to suffer from). The breed has twice neared extinction.

As usual we have barrow loads of wonderful flowering herbaceous plants and of course our infamous cream teas are available in abundance, plenty for everyone.

Chill out and have a great weekend

Ashley

Start planting your winter potatoes

Start planting your winter potatoes

Had a great day yesterday 4th and final graduation ceremony, wow how the time flies!
A wonderful day followed by an amazing electrical storm, who needs fireworks!

My good friend Nicolas Moreton is running some wonderful 2 and 3 day stone carving courses in Augusta and September have a look at his website for details. www.nicolasmoreton.com

christmas Potatoes

I guess some of you are tucking into your early potatoes, well now is the time to plant some spuds for Christmas harvest.
We have got various varieties Charlotte, Pentland Javelin etc. The tubers can be planted either in the ground, a large pot or bag at least 40 litres. Plant 4 or 5 tubers in a 40 litre container or plant in the garden 10 cm deep in rows 60 cm apart and 30 cm apart in the row. As the growth appears raise the soil / compost level up with the plant, this will encourage side shoots from the stem which will then grow more potatoes.

Planting at this time of year means that they will need frequently watering an possibly feeding until the rainfall increases in the Autumn. When watering try not to get too much moisture on the leaf as this could encourage blight.
The tubers should be ready for harvesting 10 – 12 weeks after harvesting. If your potatoes are growing in a bag when frosty weather arrives move the bag into the greenhouse or garage, let the compost dry, the tops will dry off, the potatoes will be fine in the compost. If the plants are grown in the ground they will be ok for a few weeks in the soil after the tops have died off. If the soil is very wet it will be better to lift them and store them in a cool dry, dark place. If they are damp they may rot, if they get the light on them they will go green and then taste really bitter. Remember slugs may eat them underground if the soil is very wet and you have an infestation.

We have got loads of other vegetable strips in for you to plant out in your garden.
Watch out for pigeons, slugs and cabbage white butterfly on your brassicas.

I am delighted to announce that we are now stocking the full range of Heygates horse and animal feeds, obviously we are open 7 days a week! Click here to see the range.

Remember to cut your long wiggly waggly Wisteria growth back to 6 leaves from the main stem, obviously if you are training it in a certain direction don’t cut it off!
Plenty of water and feed all round. Pick out the leaf axil growths on cordon tomatoes.
Have a great weekend

Ashley

Enjoy your home grown salad, start thinking about your Christmas meal

Enjoy your home grown salad, start thinking about your Christmas meal

Winter Veg

It’s time to start sowing/planting winter vegetables. Leeks, Brussels sprouts, winter cabbages, sprouting and spring broccoli, swedes and turnip should all be planted now for winter harvest. If you are tight for space the veg above can be sown or planted as small plants between your existing rows of lettuce, radish etc. .These will be harvested before the newly sown plants need the space. There are always loads of pests around dribbling at the mouth to get their hands on your brassicas. The cabbage white butterfly will soon be around, the eggs laid on the leaf soon hatch into hundreds of hungry caterpillars that will devour your cabbages in no time. The best way of preserving your veg under this threat is to cover them with a thin mesh before the cabbage white butterfly appears, the mesh will prevent the butterfly even laying its eggs on your plants. The mesh should be put over the brassicas like a cloche on a metal or bamboo cane frame, covering with mesh will also prevent the pigeons eating the plant, pigeons love them. Agralan make the best mesh and it is reusable year after year, you can get crop protection cloches, which include mesh and frame, other meshes can be purchased off a bulk roll. If you see the caterpillars on your plants you can either pick them off, good luck as this may take ages and you will never get them all off or give them a spray with a pesticide, Bayer Provado is probably one of the better ones. Remember to water and feed your newly planted veg regularly, with shallow roots and blazing sun they will soon perish if not watered. Once the plants are established, say 15cm tall you could put a mulch around the base of the plant i.e. grass cuttings, bark to prevent the soil drying out. Aerial attack from pigeons and butterflies, ground attack from slugs we are all used to them after this spring, there are still masses around. Put slug pellets around the plants, you could put a circle of soot around them, live nematodes can be put on the soil via a watering can, these little weevils eat slugs, slug bait, beer bath etc.

Keep feeding and dead heading all your flowering plants. Water newly planted trees once a week. Tomatoes, cucumbers need copious amounts of regular watering and feeding to get them to perform to their maximum.

We always have loads of current wonderful flowering plants in our plant area, if you are void of colour at a certain point in the season pay us a visit to get some ideas. If you have a new garden and no colour regular visits will give you an idea of what is flowering when, you may even want to buy some plants?

Have a great Silverstone weekend

Ashley

Jobs in your Garden – July

Jobs in your Garden – July

Patio rose

Water regularly

Most of the plants we get back at this time of year are because they haven’t been watered properly. Pots and Planters are the most susceptible to drying up and need watering once a day. If you are struggling to keep on top of them move them into a shady spot where they should dry out slower.

Feed your plants

Plants such as roses can really benefit from a summer feed as it can encourage a second flush in Autumn. Feeding your vegetables with a liquid feed can prevent bitterness in your crops.

Deadhead your plants

Bedding plants, roses and other perennials will benefit from regular deadheading. Picking off the fading flowers will prolong the flowering period, making your garden look more attractive. You can also get a second bloom from faded annuals by cutting them back and then fertilising them.

Keep on top of pests

The summer is prime for garden pests – keep an eye on your plants and make sure they aren’t being eaten. A common pest at this time of year is black fly who suck on the sap of plants and eventually kill them.

Plant of the Month – July

Plant of the Month – July

Our plant of the Month for July is Penstemon – Sour Grapes

Penstemon Sour Grapes

This Perennial plant grows up to 60cm in height and flowers elegant spikes of small, tubular, foxglove-like flowers and has lance-shaped leaves. They will grow quickly to form large, leafy clumps and will add some great colour into your border. They love fertile, well-drained soil in full sun or partial shade.

The sun, the rain and look after your Roses

The sun, the rain and look after your Roses

It’s a good job we decided to wrap up our cut grass to make silage rather than hay, the forecasters were right. We do need a good drop of rain on the garden. We have had a constant job on our hands keeping the plants in the Garden centre watered over the last 10 days or so. The hot weather coupled with our team holidays has meant all hands that are here are on the pump. I must invest in some irrigation! We are installing automatic watering for our chickens. At the moment we are using fill from the bottom water tanks. Occasionally when filling them the bottom does not go on correctly, so when turned up the right way you get a boot full of water!
Roses
The majority of roses in my garden look wonderful at this time of year, I have got one rose that is severely stressed for several reasons. Firstly it has got a massive black spot problem and secondly it is going yellow due to lack of feed due to the fact that it is absolutely covered in beautiful flowers. Good regular doses of Multi Rose should alleviate the black spot problem, a good foliar and root feed with maxicrop should get some colour back into the leaves. To encourage a possible re flower later in the summer it is important to cut off all the dead flowers from the roses, dead heading encourages vegetative growth, root growth and may be re flowering depending on the variety of the rose. Loads of organic matter at the base of the plant will slowly release nutrients, retain soil moisture, increase microbial activity, improve soil structure etc. Wow pile on the poo (organic matter). Some of the rose stems will be getting long, if you want to train them along a wall / fence now is the time to start loosely tying them to the structure the way you want them to grow.

If you have a Wisteria that needs a haircut, you can cut those wavy loose stems back to 6 leaves from the main stem of the plant.

We have got loads of wonderful flowering herbaceous plants for you to see.

Pop in and have a look, maybe a cream tea?

Have a good weekend,

Ashley

Great Weather for Slugs

Great weather for Slugs

Hydrangea

Those blasted slugs have eaten my Melon plants, gone in a flash! Slugs have been a massive problem this year to most Gardeners. A warm winter with very few sub-zero temperatures and a warm wet spring has allowed the slug population to flourish. As a result of this there is a shortage of slug pellets in the UK. I am pleased to say we do have a few packets left. If you don’t have any you can use non chemical controls as mentioned below.
Transplant sturdy plantlets grown on in pots, rather than young vulnerable seedlings. Transplants can be given some protection with cloches
Place traps, such as scooped out half orange, grapefruit or melon skins, laid cut side down, or jars part-filled with beer and sunk into the soil near vulnerable plants. Check and empty these regularly, preferably every morning. Proprietary traps are also available from good garden centres!
Place barriers, such as copper tapes around pots or stand containers on matting impregnated with copper salts. Moisture-absorbent minerals can be placed around plants to create slug barriers (e.g. Slug Blocker Granules). Gel repellents can also be used to create barriers around plants. Go out with a torch on mild evenings, especially when the weather is damp, and hand-pick slugs into a container. Take them to a field, hedgerow or patch of waste ground well away from gardens, at least 30 meters away as they have been found to return to where they originated. Destroy them in hot water, a strong salt solution or feed them to the birds!
Birds, frogs, toads, hedgehogs, slow-worms and ground beetles eat slugs and these predators should be encouraged in gardens
Rake over soil and remove fallen leaves during winter so birds can eat slug eggs that have been exposed.

Potatoes and slugs

The slugs that damage potatoes spend much of their time in the soil where they do not come into contact with slug pellets. The nematode treatment can be effective. Nematodes are roundworms that kill slugs in the soil, they can be purchased from Garden Centres and posted to you direct. You just mix them with water and apply to the soil in a watering can. Damage usually begins during August and becomes progressively worse the longer the crop is left in the ground. Early potatoes usually escape damage; maincrop potatoes should be lifted as soon as the tubers have matured if the soil is known to be slug infested. Heavy applications of farmyard manure and other composts can encourage slugs, and so inorganic fertilizers should be used where slugs are a problem. It is better to dig organic matter into your soil and have a slug problem rather than have no organic matter in your soil. Slugs can be treated, no organic matter in your soil will be disastrous!

Potatoes vary in their susceptibility to slugs. ‘Maris Piper’, ‘Cara’, ‘Arran Banner’, ‘Kirsty’, ‘Maris Bard’, ‘Maris Peer’, ‘Kondor’, ‘Pentland Crown’ and ‘Rocket’ are frequently damaged, whereas ‘Romano’, ‘Pentland Dell’, ‘Pentland Squire’, ‘Wilja’, ‘Charlotte’, ‘Golden Wonder’, ‘Kestrel’, ‘Estima’, ‘Stemster’, ‘Sante’ and ‘Pentland Ivory’ are less susceptible. Damaged potatoes are more vulnerable to storage rots and the crop should be sorted into sound and damaged tubers, with the latter being stored separately for early consumption.

Chemical control

Following the manufactures instructions scatter slug pellets thinly around vulnerable plants, such as seedlings, vegetables and young shoots on herbaceous plants. It is important store pellets safely and scatter them thinly as they can harm other wildlife, pets and young children if eaten in quantity.

There are two types of pellet available to the gardener; those that contain metaldehyde or ferric sulphate Ferric sulphate is relatively non-toxic to vertebrate animals.

A liquid formulation of metaldehyde is available for watering on to ornamental plants and the soil, it should not be applied to edible plants.

Most plants, once established, will tolerate some slug damage and control measures can be discontinued.

We released our annual hive of Bumble bees this week. The Ducklings are now 10 days old.
Wet or dry its great weather for planting out Vegetables.
Our Nursery is full of wonderful plants.

Have a great slug free weekend

Ashley

Keep your garden flowering

Keep your garden flowering

Agapanthus

It’s been a long growing season this year. Several customers have been asking which flowering plants we have in stock, they have few flowers in their own gardens ( as they have all flowered) for displaying at their local Horticultural shows. The best way to try to prolong flowering in plants is to keep dead heading them and feed and water them. Plant some later flowering varieties Echinacea, Rudbekia, Asters, Lavender, Schizostylis, Agapanthus we have got loads of these at the Garden Centre to add masses of colour to your garden.

I hope by now most people have all their winter veg planted, there is still time to plant potatoes to crop before Christmas, be quick we have a few bags left. They are best planted in a container so that you can get them out of the severe frost.

At this time of year preserving and pickling fruit and veg should be the name of the game, freezing is very trendy and easy. Picking veg young and sweet is better than letting them get bigger and older. Sugar levels are higher and fibre levels lower in younger veg. Preserving is all about the prevention of rot, keeping the fungus and bacteria at bay, pickling, freezing, drying.

It’s a good time of year to collect seeds from plants that you would like to grow next year. I have got my eye on a Quercus castaneifolia, I can assure you there are not many of these in this country! I keep meaning to pick a few of Charlotte’s sweet peas to grow in our hedge.

The wildflowers I planted last year have looked absolutely fantastic all year, however they are now running out of steam and looking a bit untidy. A few are still flowering, it is tempting to cut them down but they must be left to set and drop their seed. Most are annuals, if we removed the vegetation now we would remove the seed as well. The vegetation is best left until completely dry and dead, remove late October. There are a few grass weeds creeping in, I am tempted to spray them with glyphosate during the winter before the wild flowers start to grow again.

Our spring flowering bulbs are now in the shop, it is good to get the daffodils in early as they root before the tulips and other bulbs. Planting bulbs now is a guarantee of masses of colour early next spring in your containers or garden.

Steve joined us this week as our Plant area manager, his previous life was 18 years with the biggest garden centre group in the country. I hope he is ok with the culture shock? We look forward to Steve helping you to enjoy your gardens and us to expand our ranges of plants at Bell Plantation.

In the Poultry department we are recruiting, we need some part time help in the poultry department, if you are interested or know someone who is drop me a line Ashley@bellplantation.co.uk

Have a great weekend

Ashley Warren

Rotten tomatoes and re-doing your lawn

Rotten tomatoes and re-doing your lawn

In August the gardener can go on holiday with no worries, provided he has mown the lawn, watered thoroughly and asked a friend to pick the fruit and vegetables’. Just depends how long the holiday is and how hot the weather. Don’t be lulled into a false sense of security with the rain showers we are getting, they hardly lay the dust. Keep pouring on the water until there is a prolonged spell of consistent rain.

rotten tomatoes

I have had a few people ask me this year about their tomatoes going rotten on the end. This is Blossom end rot it is a physiological condition, not a disease or pest. It is caused by lack of calcium. There is no quick fix, and it is difficult to save the fruits that are affected. The lack of calcium in the plant is usually caused by lack of water, calcium is taken up into the plant in the water, so if there is a lack of water the plant does not get the required amount of calcium from the soil/compost. It is less likely that your soil or compost lacks calcium, if it does add plenty of well-balanced Tomorite to the water, “Probably the best plant food in the world”, it’s as good for plants as Carlsberg.

If you have the most awful lawn in the world now is the time to start the process of re doing it. The main reason for doing it now is that you can get a perfectly flat smooth surface, the soil is so dry and easy to work, no mess, no mud! I suggest spraying the whole lawn with roundup, glyphosate, be careful not to touch any other plants as it will kill them. Leave the lawn for a couple of weeks to go brown. Once brown, cultivate by rotavating or hand digging until you achieve a very fine tilth. Once you have a fine tilth, level and stone pick and firm the soil before sowing the seed. There are numerous types of grass seed to choose from, very fine grasses good to look at not very hard wearing, harder wearing mixes which will include some ryegrass which will need mowing a little more frequently. After sowing lightly rake and firm. The other option is to lay turf instead, instant but will possibly need constant watering (if done in the summer). It sounds really easy, well it is if you have the right equipment and /or don’t mind a bit of hard work. Well worth it in the long run.
If you need more advice of help drop me a line at the Garden Centre ashley@bellplantation.co.uk

As usual we have an abundance of wonderful late flowering herbaceous plants. Great cream teas!

Have a great weekend

Ashley

Jobs in your garden – August

Jobs in your garden – August

summer flower

Water the Plants

It’s very dry at the moment so it’s really important that your plants have enough water for them to survive. The summer sun is pulling all the moisture out of the leaves and it can cause a lot of stress on your plants. Check your plants regularly to see if they are wilting and give them lots of water to keep them going.

Feed, Feed, Feed

All the watering you are doing to keep your plants alive will slowly wash the nutrients from the compost in your pots and planters so keep feeding your plants. Feed them every fortnight for the rest of the summer to keep them looking good.

Dead-head regularly

A few minutes every day of deadheading will keep the garden looking smart. It encourages plants to produce more flowers and not to run to seed. Harvesting also encourages plants to keep producing, so pick dahlias with regularity and beans and courgettes while they are still young and fresh.

Watch out for Cabbage white butterfly

Now is the time that Cabbage White Butterfly start to breed and devour your delicious cabbages. Keep an eye out for the butterfly eggs on the leaves of your brassica as they will soon turn into lots of caterpillars. When they grow you can pick them off the leaves but this will take some time, a good bug killer will also work. The best form of defence is prevention – cover your cabbages with a fine netting to stop the butterfly getting to them.

Prune Wisteria

Your Wisteria need pruning twice a year, in Jan/Feb and again in the summer. Pruning keeps its size under control and improves the quality of its flowering. Cut back to 6 leaves from the previous growth and this will encourage it to flower.

Try and have a chilled weekend and keep your trees watered

Try and have a chilled weekend and keep your trees watered

Great weather for relaxing in the shade of a large tree, drinking a cool iced drink with condensation running down the outside of the glass… Heaven!!

Just think of the poor old tree working overtime, transpiration in overdrive trying to keep its leaves from baking crisp in the searing heat.

If you have trees or shrubs planted in the last 2 -3 years give them some consideration in this fierce heat as well as your newly planted plants. The root system on 2 -3 year planted plants will very soon start to struggle finding enough water to keep them alive. I planted a row of London Plane trees last year and they are showing signs of stress, a few leaves going yellow and falling to the ground. Over the last couple of nights I have given them each 20 litres of water, if the heat stays at this level I will probably do that twice a week. When the temperature drops to 20 degrees C once a week will do until mid-September or a damn good rain.

The combines are out in force harvesting the rape and winter barley, I think it will be at least a couple of weeks before any wheat is ready in South Northants. I expect the harvest will be good this year as we have really great average weather. Could do with some rain as my cows are getting short of grass.

The fish in our pond here at the Bell Plantation have done a lot of floating on the top of the water looking dead, I am pleased to say we haven’t had any fatalities yet! Shower them with a hose pipe and they dive to the bottom of the pond. The reason is oxygen depletion in the water due to the weather. In thundery, cloudy weather the oxygenating plants produce less oxygen due to reduce sunlight, the temperatures are usually higher which warm up the water, warmer water holds less oxygen. Prevention is to have a deeper pond to help keep the water cooler and to oxygenate the water more, buy a bigger better pump or even clean the filter on your existing pump.

Pigs

We started our collection of rare breed farm animals this week with the arrival of 3 Oxford Sandy and Black females, 12 weeks old. The Oxford Sandy and Black is a breed of domestic pig originating in Oxfordshire. Named for its colour, which is a base of sandy brown with black patches, the breed is also sometimes called the “Plum Pudding” or “Oxford Forest” pig it is one of the oldest pigs native to Britain. It’s a docile pig suited to being reared outdoors, where its colour protects it from sunburn (which pink pigs tend to suffer from). The breed has twice neared extinction.

As usual we have barrow loads of wonderful flowering herbaceous plants and of course our infamous cream teas are available in abundance, plenty for everyone.

Chill out and have a great weekend

Ashley

Start planting your winter potatoes

Start planting your winter potatoes

Had a great day yesterday 4th and final graduation ceremony, wow how the time flies!
A wonderful day followed by an amazing electrical storm, who needs fireworks!

My good friend Nicolas Moreton is running some wonderful 2 and 3 day stone carving courses in Augusta and September have a look at his website for details. www.nicolasmoreton.com

christmas Potatoes

I guess some of you are tucking into your early potatoes, well now is the time to plant some spuds for Christmas harvest.
We have got various varieties Charlotte, Pentland Javelin etc. The tubers can be planted either in the ground, a large pot or bag at least 40 litres. Plant 4 or 5 tubers in a 40 litre container or plant in the garden 10 cm deep in rows 60 cm apart and 30 cm apart in the row. As the growth appears raise the soil / compost level up with the plant, this will encourage side shoots from the stem which will then grow more potatoes.

Planting at this time of year means that they will need frequently watering an possibly feeding until the rainfall increases in the Autumn. When watering try not to get too much moisture on the leaf as this could encourage blight.
The tubers should be ready for harvesting 10 – 12 weeks after harvesting. If your potatoes are growing in a bag when frosty weather arrives move the bag into the greenhouse or garage, let the compost dry, the tops will dry off, the potatoes will be fine in the compost. If the plants are grown in the ground they will be ok for a few weeks in the soil after the tops have died off. If the soil is very wet it will be better to lift them and store them in a cool dry, dark place. If they are damp they may rot, if they get the light on them they will go green and then taste really bitter. Remember slugs may eat them underground if the soil is very wet and you have an infestation.

We have got loads of other vegetable strips in for you to plant out in your garden.
Watch out for pigeons, slugs and cabbage white butterfly on your brassicas.

I am delighted to announce that we are now stocking the full range of Heygates horse and animal feeds, obviously we are open 7 days a week! Click here to see the range.

Remember to cut your long wiggly waggly Wisteria growth back to 6 leaves from the main stem, obviously if you are training it in a certain direction don’t cut it off!
Plenty of water and feed all round. Pick out the leaf axil growths on cordon tomatoes.
Have a great weekend

Ashley

Enjoy your home grown salad, start thinking about your Christmas meal

Enjoy your home grown salad, start thinking about your Christmas meal

Winter Veg

It’s time to start sowing/planting winter vegetables. Leeks, Brussels sprouts, winter cabbages, sprouting and spring broccoli, swedes and turnip should all be planted now for winter harvest. If you are tight for space the veg above can be sown or planted as small plants between your existing rows of lettuce, radish etc. .These will be harvested before the newly sown plants need the space. There are always loads of pests around dribbling at the mouth to get their hands on your brassicas. The cabbage white butterfly will soon be around, the eggs laid on the leaf soon hatch into hundreds of hungry caterpillars that will devour your cabbages in no time. The best way of preserving your veg under this threat is to cover them with a thin mesh before the cabbage white butterfly appears, the mesh will prevent the butterfly even laying its eggs on your plants. The mesh should be put over the brassicas like a cloche on a metal or bamboo cane frame, covering with mesh will also prevent the pigeons eating the plant, pigeons love them. Agralan make the best mesh and it is reusable year after year, you can get crop protection cloches, which include mesh and frame, other meshes can be purchased off a bulk roll. If you see the caterpillars on your plants you can either pick them off, good luck as this may take ages and you will never get them all off or give them a spray with a pesticide, Bayer Provado is probably one of the better ones. Remember to water and feed your newly planted veg regularly, with shallow roots and blazing sun they will soon perish if not watered. Once the plants are established, say 15cm tall you could put a mulch around the base of the plant i.e. grass cuttings, bark to prevent the soil drying out. Aerial attack from pigeons and butterflies, ground attack from slugs we are all used to them after this spring, there are still masses around. Put slug pellets around the plants, you could put a circle of soot around them, live nematodes can be put on the soil via a watering can, these little weevils eat slugs, slug bait, beer bath etc.

Keep feeding and dead heading all your flowering plants. Water newly planted trees once a week. Tomatoes, cucumbers need copious amounts of regular watering and feeding to get them to perform to their maximum.

We always have loads of current wonderful flowering plants in our plant area, if you are void of colour at a certain point in the season pay us a visit to get some ideas. If you have a new garden and no colour regular visits will give you an idea of what is flowering when, you may even want to buy some plants?

Have a great Silverstone weekend

Ashley

Jobs in your Garden – July

Jobs in your Garden – July

Patio rose

Water regularly

Most of the plants we get back at this time of year are because they haven’t been watered properly. Pots and Planters are the most susceptible to drying up and need watering once a day. If you are struggling to keep on top of them move them into a shady spot where they should dry out slower.

Feed your plants

Plants such as roses can really benefit from a summer feed as it can encourage a second flush in Autumn. Feeding your vegetables with a liquid feed can prevent bitterness in your crops.

Deadhead your plants

Bedding plants, roses and other perennials will benefit from regular deadheading. Picking off the fading flowers will prolong the flowering period, making your garden look more attractive. You can also get a second bloom from faded annuals by cutting them back and then fertilising them.

Keep on top of pests

The summer is prime for garden pests – keep an eye on your plants and make sure they aren’t being eaten. A common pest at this time of year is black fly who suck on the sap of plants and eventually kill them.

Plant of the Month – July

Plant of the Month – July

Our plant of the Month for July is Penstemon – Sour Grapes

Penstemon Sour Grapes

This Perennial plant grows up to 60cm in height and flowers elegant spikes of small, tubular, foxglove-like flowers and has lance-shaped leaves. They will grow quickly to form large, leafy clumps and will add some great colour into your border. They love fertile, well-drained soil in full sun or partial shade.

The sun, the rain and look after your Roses

The sun, the rain and look after your Roses

It’s a good job we decided to wrap up our cut grass to make silage rather than hay, the forecasters were right. We do need a good drop of rain on the garden. We have had a constant job on our hands keeping the plants in the Garden centre watered over the last 10 days or so. The hot weather coupled with our team holidays has meant all hands that are here are on the pump. I must invest in some irrigation! We are installing automatic watering for our chickens. At the moment we are using fill from the bottom water tanks. Occasionally when filling them the bottom does not go on correctly, so when turned up the right way you get a boot full of water!
Roses
The majority of roses in my garden look wonderful at this time of year, I have got one rose that is severely stressed for several reasons. Firstly it has got a massive black spot problem and secondly it is going yellow due to lack of feed due to the fact that it is absolutely covered in beautiful flowers. Good regular doses of Multi Rose should alleviate the black spot problem, a good foliar and root feed with maxicrop should get some colour back into the leaves. To encourage a possible re flower later in the summer it is important to cut off all the dead flowers from the roses, dead heading encourages vegetative growth, root growth and may be re flowering depending on the variety of the rose. Loads of organic matter at the base of the plant will slowly release nutrients, retain soil moisture, increase microbial activity, improve soil structure etc. Wow pile on the poo (organic matter). Some of the rose stems will be getting long, if you want to train them along a wall / fence now is the time to start loosely tying them to the structure the way you want them to grow.

If you have a Wisteria that needs a haircut, you can cut those wavy loose stems back to 6 leaves from the main stem of the plant.

We have got loads of wonderful flowering herbaceous plants for you to see.

Pop in and have a look, maybe a cream tea?

Have a good weekend,

Ashley

Great Weather for Slugs

Great weather for Slugs

Hydrangea

Those blasted slugs have eaten my Melon plants, gone in a flash! Slugs have been a massive problem this year to most Gardeners. A warm winter with very few sub-zero temperatures and a warm wet spring has allowed the slug population to flourish. As a result of this there is a shortage of slug pellets in the UK. I am pleased to say we do have a few packets left. If you don’t have any you can use non chemical controls as mentioned below.
Transplant sturdy plantlets grown on in pots, rather than young vulnerable seedlings. Transplants can be given some protection with cloches
Place traps, such as scooped out half orange, grapefruit or melon skins, laid cut side down, or jars part-filled with beer and sunk into the soil near vulnerable plants. Check and empty these regularly, preferably every morning. Proprietary traps are also available from good garden centres!
Place barriers, such as copper tapes around pots or stand containers on matting impregnated with copper salts. Moisture-absorbent minerals can be placed around plants to create slug barriers (e.g. Slug Blocker Granules). Gel repellents can also be used to create barriers around plants. Go out with a torch on mild evenings, especially when the weather is damp, and hand-pick slugs into a container. Take them to a field, hedgerow or patch of waste ground well away from gardens, at least 30 meters away as they have been found to return to where they originated. Destroy them in hot water, a strong salt solution or feed them to the birds!
Birds, frogs, toads, hedgehogs, slow-worms and ground beetles eat slugs and these predators should be encouraged in gardens
Rake over soil and remove fallen leaves during winter so birds can eat slug eggs that have been exposed.

Potatoes and slugs

The slugs that damage potatoes spend much of their time in the soil where they do not come into contact with slug pellets. The nematode treatment can be effective. Nematodes are roundworms that kill slugs in the soil, they can be purchased from Garden Centres and posted to you direct. You just mix them with water and apply to the soil in a watering can. Damage usually begins during August and becomes progressively worse the longer the crop is left in the ground. Early potatoes usually escape damage; maincrop potatoes should be lifted as soon as the tubers have matured if the soil is known to be slug infested. Heavy applications of farmyard manure and other composts can encourage slugs, and so inorganic fertilizers should be used where slugs are a problem. It is better to dig organic matter into your soil and have a slug problem rather than have no organic matter in your soil. Slugs can be treated, no organic matter in your soil will be disastrous!

Potatoes vary in their susceptibility to slugs. ‘Maris Piper’, ‘Cara’, ‘Arran Banner’, ‘Kirsty’, ‘Maris Bard’, ‘Maris Peer’, ‘Kondor’, ‘Pentland Crown’ and ‘Rocket’ are frequently damaged, whereas ‘Romano’, ‘Pentland Dell’, ‘Pentland Squire’, ‘Wilja’, ‘Charlotte’, ‘Golden Wonder’, ‘Kestrel’, ‘Estima’, ‘Stemster’, ‘Sante’ and ‘Pentland Ivory’ are less susceptible. Damaged potatoes are more vulnerable to storage rots and the crop should be sorted into sound and damaged tubers, with the latter being stored separately for early consumption.

Chemical control

Following the manufactures instructions scatter slug pellets thinly around vulnerable plants, such as seedlings, vegetables and young shoots on herbaceous plants. It is important store pellets safely and scatter them thinly as they can harm other wildlife, pets and young children if eaten in quantity.

There are two types of pellet available to the gardener; those that contain metaldehyde or ferric sulphate Ferric sulphate is relatively non-toxic to vertebrate animals.

A liquid formulation of metaldehyde is available for watering on to ornamental plants and the soil, it should not be applied to edible plants.

Most plants, once established, will tolerate some slug damage and control measures can be discontinued.

We released our annual hive of Bumble bees this week. The Ducklings are now 10 days old.
Wet or dry its great weather for planting out Vegetables.
Our Nursery is full of wonderful plants.

Have a great slug free weekend

Ashley